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now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
in a piece in the wall street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambass do, who had nothing to do with benghazi? and was simply making a presentation based on intel jeps that she had received? and to besmirch her reputation? is outra
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
uncertainty with egypt, uncertainty on its border with jordan, civil war in syria, probl problems with hezbollah and lebanon. not to mention iran. there's no port in the storm. this is now the new middle east. >> and richard, doesn't that make syria all the more important, you know, golan heights took mortar fire from syria, israel really doesn't want to get involved. you know, spread itself thin in syria, and i think that's why international action on syria is so important right now. >> it's one of the fault lines in the middle east. i think if you're an israeli, it's not the one at the moment that keeps you up at night the most. >> right. >> i still think the palestinian is the closest. then you've got egypt which is the anchor of israel's security. and i think actually the israelis are most worried about jordan. the israelis are not central to the dynamic in syria. syria which began as a civil war and spread into the proxy has the potential to become a regional war. just when the thought the middle east can get worse, it can. >> what's your assessment of pretty much the fact th
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
of the entire region. syria, and the disorder spills across the neighborhood. joining us again, and fbi supervisory agent. you see that as late? >> what is happening in syria, you have to look at it from a few different perspectives. first you have the syrian people who want freedom from bashar al-assad's regime. then you have regional conflict that is going on. this is between iran and turkey. turkey is supporting the iranian people and iran is supporting the regime. you also have to look at it on a different level. where you have russia and china also involved on global levels with the syrian conflict. it is becoming a war of shadows and a war of different phones. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this
week. thousands of refugees have left. the violence in syria killed more than 36,000 people since an uprising over syrian president bashar al assad's regime. >>> israel fired a rn warning s from a stray shell. israel filed a complaint with the united nations over that incident. there are concerns the violence in syria will spill over into neighboring countries. >>> and more breaking news at this hour from israel. the military there targeting militants in the gaza strip following several rocket attacks. this morning militants there launched ten rockets into southern israel. a rocket hit a house, damaging that home and nearby cars overnight. no one was hurt. the israeli air force carried out several raids in the gaza strip in response to palestinian rocket fire. israel says more than 110 rockets have hit israel since saturday. >>> investigators want to know why they're only finding out now about the investigation that revealed now former cia director general petraeus' affair. the fbi launched the investigation who jill kelley, an unpaid social liaison at an air force base in florida
street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how
. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this has been going back for centuries. how we engage with that? remapped welcome of, the problem that has been happening today in syria, there is no one to fill the vacuum of bashar al-assad's falling. the new coalition of the opposition -- the syrian opposition, they get together and they elected a leader. that leadership is not a leadership that has been outside syria for 20 years. it is for people who actually were in syria until recently. jenna: there are questions about that leadership and whether it is genuine or whether or not it is the second in command, the muslim brotherhood member is someone that should be looked at again. thomas friedman makes this argument today th
peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been engaged to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splinters and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assaad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legiti
of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engaged with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel, which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to, you know, various
northern border given the increasing anarchy inside syria and the potential the spillover into lebanon and across israel's border. much like the squeeze they felt in 2006. i think we're entering into a time of real danger and potential hostilities on both sides of the israeli border. lou: your thoughts. >> the brigade, the commander of which was killed by the israelis , are really the strategic army of hamas. my concern is that hamas has to a strategic alliances, one basically with the muslim brotherhood now in charge of egypt, but more importantly with the iranian regime. hamas is escalating against the israelis was prompted their response to put pressure on israel and divert the attention from syria. that is the way to get out of the syrian complex situation. this is a challenge to the administration. wh would you do if israel takes out the hamas military leader? it's a big question. lou: and a question that we're going to turn to judy miller for the answer when we come back. is this a strategic response that will drive straight at the heart of the iranians and put in jeopardy their
death comes all too frequently now in syria. today it was twin bombings in the capital city of damascus. people ran after the first explosion and that's when the killers detonated a second bomb. nearly 50 people died. there is no word on who is behind the attack. it is but the latest in the bloody battle between syria's government and its rebels. rebel fighters claim to have shot down two government aircraft within the past 24 hours. that helicopter war planes shelling people on the ground. the government shelling its own people. they have access to antiaircraft missiles. that would be a change. the burning wreckage of the military jet as well as its injured pilot apparently unconscious fox news cannot confirm the report. >> 29 people crashes in the indian notion. and tops our news around the world in 80 seconds. the jet liner went down small ireland nation off the southeast coast of africa. you can see the tail sticking out of the water. he noticed a plane leaking fuel like a faucet after takeoff and alerted the crew. the pilot tried to land at nearby airport but had to ditch it in the
peace in the middle east including the civil war ongoing in syria right across the border from israel. >> it's a concentration of chemical weapons. >> are they secure right now? >> they're under the control of assad. i'm not sure they are secure. i wouldn't trust him very much. and they get missiles from iran. and some people say it's okay. what do they mean okay? they're collectors of missiles. they shoot them against civilian life in tel aviv. look, the world must also take a clear position to say it is disproportionate israeli reaction and shooting at israelis proportionate. after israel left gaza, how long can they destroy any chance for reason and peace? >> what's the role of iran that is playing right now behind the scenes in gaza? >> iran it feels competing with egypt. they want to win -- their chance is to have the more extreme on their side. so they support not only hamas but also the jihad. >> islamic jihad? >> islamic jihad in gaza. so the islamic jihad also to be more extreme. other problems in gaza is there's nobody rules it. there's a competition among four or five diffe
in 60 minutes n syria, two car bombs exploded in a town near damascus. the number of people wounded and killed is high and rising. at least 45 people, mostly civilians are reported dead. more than 100 injured. the bombs went off in a town known as a refuge for people forced from their homes by this civil war in syria. they weren't the only explosions. two bombs went off at the same time in a residential neighborhood in damascus. we don't know yet how many people are hurt or who is claiming responsibility. this is the wreckage of a syrian air force jet crashed and burning not far from aleppo. rebel fighters claim they shot it down and captured one of the pilots. this is amateur film. a cnn crew was just on the scene after the crash. rebels saying they also shot down a government helicopter yesterday. that captured on video. take a look. an opposition group posted its facebook page that the free syrian army brought down the helicopter with an anti aircraft weapon. we don't know what happened to the people who were actually on board that helicopter. we want to go straight to washington
your allies to make a bolder move in syria? guest: the u.s. is already doing something. i think the rest of u.s. allies, turkey, they're afraid of getting involved in this conflict. the only pressure, i think, the most active countries right now are probably qatar and saudi arabia, which we believe are supplying arms to the free syrian army, to the rebels. the u.s. and turkey are actually doing some things, they have special forces along the border who are reportedly vetting to whom those arms get delivered so they don't get delivered into the most fundamentalist gee haw dee forces. i think it's unclear exactly what the status of that is right now. yfl that allies as it happened in libya and england sort of really took the bull by the horns and pulled the u.s. into action there. it doesn't seem like that is the case in syria. i think there's a fear that it could inflame the region and i think there's a degree of caution. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi
not have the divisions we are facing in syria. i so far there are issues that they are facing but i think we should have hope and faith and i think with the political settlement this should provide a ground for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. greg. >> i would like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on this very dreary day especially after a holiday for i'm sure many of you. and thanks to you as well for staying up a little late and giving us his great insight. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president barack obama was reelected. and the obama administration had a number of i think foreign policy and counter terrorism successes during the first administration obviously osama bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama has overseen the drawdown of troops in iraq as well as in afghanistan. and yet i think one of the most lasting legacies from the first term of the obama administration may well be what u.s. officials term the yemen model. this is sort of how it is that the u.s. is going to fi
treaty. >> what about syria? there have been some incidents of fire coming into the israeli part of the golan heights from syria. what's the latest on that? >> our estimation is all the remotes events have to do with stray bullets or stray mortars. nothing more than that. it's an internal conflict inside syria. and that's the way we treat it. >> is it a serious situation on the golan heights right now with syria or is it a temporary thing? >> it's a temporary thing. the borders are quiet. we see it as an internal syrian conflict which has nothing to do with us. >> and you're on the lebanese border with hezbollah, that's quiet as well? >> it's quiet but tense. hezbollah has acquired a huge arsenal of over 60,000 rockets and tried to think how many other militaries in the world even hold these amount of rockets. a speech was given today urging all the arab countries to smuggle rockets into gaza so hamas can use them. >> one final question, iran. what if any role are they playing in all of this? >> iran is, i would say, pulling the strings in many of the terror organizations in the
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are goin
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
, syria, the islamic republic of iran and the united states of america. well, harold coe says, what a disgrace. how can the united states be a world leader on women's rights and not sign this treaty? well, let's take a look. what would radification mean? we don't have to guess what ratification means. the american bar association has written a book-length report, 200 pages, explaining exactly what american compliance would mean. the aba report is based on the work of the u.n. monitoring committees. they go to the countries when they ratify the treaty. so when they went to britain or australia or canada, they wrote a report. what were they telling these countries to do, how would you follow the treaty? well, the aba report opposes thousands of questions, all of them potential lawsuits. the aba claims, first of all, it's not about equality under the law, it's about de facto equality; that is, equality of result, statistical equality. the aba states gender quotas are not voluntary, it creates an obligation for a quota system. so i'm just going to run through a few of these questions fr
there in cairo. martha: so much turmoil in that area. there are also new reports of violence rocking syria today. this is brand-new video of the aftermath. look at this. four explosions went off in a suburb near the syrian capitol. at least 56 people dead in those explosions, dozens more are injured. several homes and buildings were destroyed. the blast reportedly caused by two bobby trapped cars and two other explosive devices. no group has claimed responsibility in this. syrian police say that it has the trademarks of an al-qaida-affiliated organization. >> another alert right now on the floor of the u.s. senate. senate minority leader republican mitch mcconnell saying that raising tax rates in this economy is the last thing that the government should do in america. here is senator mcconnell just moments ago. have a listen. >> the only reason democrats are insisting on raising rates is because raising rates on the so-called rich is the holy grail of liberalism. their aim isn't job creation, they are interested in wealth destruction. bill: part of the reason why this is getting so much attentio
is at a wine tasting. we have we've got israel conflicts, syria, pending issues with iran. not a lot of trump with the muslim brotherhood. where are the priorities? >> you think this would be the exactly the time when you need your secretary of state engaged full force. anticipating the hearings coming up in congress and she finds herself conveniently out of touch in australia. she was the one that general petraeus resigned and took him off the stage. now hillary clinton is out. she is off the stage for now. we'll continue to drill on this but the balance of power and u.s. influence does need a secretary of state on tab. we've got two things, the continuing developments in benghazi and how we have to investigate that completely. plus to avert a disaster in the middle east. i don't see her on the job. >> iran, libya, where is the secretary of state. why isn't she testifying this week. the american people have a right to know. what they knew, when they knew it. our state department was watching libya unfold in realtime. >> benghazi is more than just a murder investigation of four fellow citizen
in the conflict in syria. >>trace: not surprising. thank you, jonathan hunt outside the united nations. a journalist and expert on the middle east joins us. i pose the same question to you: will the truce hold. >>guest: it doesn't have too many, we don't have too much hope. we are dealing with a terrorist organization, which is considered by the united states and the west, for hamas. we are not dealing with the palestinian authority leader, and his absence is noted. with the pros and the cons, the consequences being we are creating an artificial truce with a cease-fire, cutting east supply, but are we cutting off demand if iran continues to supply the groups, the terrorist elements it is not just hamas or egypt watching what goes through the sinai peninsula, but, the pros being where the united states is concerned, saying to egypt we are giving you allowance so lay big brother and you watch out what goes on. >>trace: i remember several years back when there was a bus bombing that israel would respond strongly and today there was a bus bombing in tel aviv. are you surprised the cease-fi
detected on his clothing. >>> activists in syria say dozen of people were wounded when they bombed an to live press factory. rebel controlled town near the turkish border was also attacked from the air. the facility included refugee camp there. syrian rebels meantime reportedly shot down a government helicopter today. >> bret: north carolina doesn't get the joke. if you did not shop on black friday, alert the media. we'll explain in the grapevin grapevine. >> bret: now fresh pickings from the political grapevine. cnn reports every american went shopping over black friday weekend. really. almost every one of you. the headline on the website reads 247 million shoppers visited stores and websites black friday weekend. "weekly standard" notes the numbers are suspicious taking away those too young to shop. so it would mean for the statistics to be believed shoppers would include 4.4 million people aged 75 to 79. 3 million age 80 to 84. 2 million that were 85 to 89. nearly 1 million between 90 and 94. 300,000 were 95 and older. the numbers include those who just visited websites. which s
to your broader question republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the newseum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more involvement and there are a lot of big issues he has a huge influence on because of his experience, respect and personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on but two or three have said they're putting holds on a nomination. no bell laureate economists nominated for the federal reserve who was finally withdrew his name after a year of waiting because he was not going to be -- >> consumer. >> and the consumer protection service agency, elizabeth warren's former agency so you have people all over the place, judges -- >> ambassadors. >> when lindsey graham mentioned yesterday was john boughten and that was, okay, a warning because john was not confirmed for u.n. ambassador then was a recess appointee. no way the president will nominate a secretary of state as a recess appointee. you cannot with credible lead diplomacy over
remember the mortar shells coming from syria, we heard for the third time in just a week, there has been something coming in from syria into israel, a soldier from the israeli military was injured by shrapnel coming in from syria today. back to you. >> brian: thanks so much. >> steve: be careful. >> gretchen: now the other stories making headlines. it's official. jon corzine thanked mf global. his bad management decisions led to the firm's bankruptcy and loss of $1.6 billion in customers' money. specifically the report says that he created an atmosphere where no one could challenge his decisions. corzine used to be the democratic governor of new jersey. >> steve: meanwhile, it could have been him. this morning we're hearing from the owner of the plane that crashed into a home leaving three people dead. roger latham was supposed to be on the plane with three pilots heading to an faa safety conference. at the last minute, he decided to go hunting instead. >> horrible thing. i don't really know what to say about that. i kind of feel guilty in some sense. >> steve: he is awe live. the pilots
of syria, all the murderers and very evil forces in the region that support hamas. it's not their interest of the countries in the region to support hamas. terrorism can spill over. we saw it in egypt. how 16 egyptian soldiers were murdered because of the spillover of terrorism from gaza, ham as. >> all right. thank you very much for coming on and talking about the israeli side of this. we appreciate your time. i want now to get to the other side of the conflict and bring in the chief representative of the general delegation of the palestine liberation organization to the united states. good to talk to you, ambassador and to talk to you again. >> thank you. >> the other day when you were on this program before the cease-fire and i asked you whether you supported hamas, you said when it comes to our differences with hamas we have differences practically. this is normal. but what is happening in the gaza strip, a direct attack on innocent civilians, we're witnessing a deliberate escalation on the part of the israelis to cause as much possible civilian deaths." given that, do you think the ce
were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed yasser arafat's tomb for a second time. a dignified ceremony. the palestinian's lost leader has not been allowed to rest peacefully. shielded by blue screens, scientists took samples from his body to try to clear up a near decade of conjecture on the spf theory that says that when a gravely ill arafat said farewell to his
on this. who benefits from this is syria and spotlight . syria gets the spotlight off and iran makes the weapon program excel. >> but a lot of people are putting the iranians behind hamas on this. hamas is alienated themselves from the iranians and moved out of sir yampt hamas always would have preferred to work with sunni than shiia and now they have those people to work with and all of the arms they want coming out of libya and tunisia after the arab spring. the reliance on the iranians is much less. >> brian: they sided with the syrian rebels and hesbollah sided with the syrian government. very complicated. great analysis. >> thank you, sir. >> brian: we move on on the run down. the camera was rolling in the moment of immingpact. >> look at that. >> brian: wow. the story behind the video next. candidate obama made this promise to the nation's heroes. >> no veteran should have to wait months or years for the benefits that you earned. >> brian: but the next guest said the president has not delivered. his story will blow you away. my friend told me about a great new way to get deals.
news has obtained a classified cable showing that the state department was warned about syria's security concerns long before the attack was carried out. also three u.s. senators are calling for a congressional committee to investigate the administration's handling of the attack. molly henneberg is in washington with more. hi, molly. >> hi. this classified cable was sent august 16 to the state department that was less than one month before the september 11 attack in libya. and it describes how u.s. personnel on the ground were making contingency plans. the cable reads in part, quote: this daily pattern of violence would be the new normal for the foreseeable future. went on to say, quote, personnel could co- locate to the annex, talking about the c.i.a. annex -- if the security environment downgraded suddenly. it also reveals they were concerned about the trustworthiness of the libyan militia, the 17 february brigade, which was protecting the consulate, noting, quote, certain sectors of the 17 february brigade were very hesitant to share information with the americans. one repu
situation in syria, iran and its nuclear efforts and immigration reform just to name a few. ed henry joins us live from the white house. >> reporter: they may be in celebration mode still. after the euphoria of victory the president taking congratulatory calls from 13 leaders who have called in the last 24 hours saying congratulations. but that euphoria giving way to a lot of challenges on the world stage and the domestic as well. the fiscal cliff is bubbling up quickly. while you have democratic leaders suggesting they have a strong hand in the negotiations and they will cooperate with republicans. you have republicans saying if the president raises taxes in these negotiations it could blow up on democrats. take a listen. >> i'm going to do everything within my power to be as conciliatory as possible. i want to work together, but i what everyone to also understand you can't push us around. >> i think it will require tax increases on the wealthy. the wealthy are the people who hire everyone else. you can't love jobs and hate job creators, martha. he hates job creators. >> reporter: the res
, especially given recent evidence that their shipments to syria and elsewhere? >> with respect to north korea -- they would have to demonstrate a series of meeting their data goal of denuclearization. we have engaged with the north normal basand is. we have not seen the steps. we have laid out what they need to do in terms of that kind of demonstration of seriousness with respect to denuclearization. have not seen that from them. there is an interesting question about burma. and the united states and embrace ofbama's their reform efforts and support for it. in no other way that you can imagines is an entry by berman into the international community is what comes of that and the opportunity that it provides. economically. that is an important focus of the burmese leadership. the economic prospects and promises of their coming into the international community and supported by the u.s. that is a path that if the north koreans would address the nuclear issue, that would be available to them. we have said that from the outset. it is an important example for them to contemplate. it is a regime that
sending missile parts to syria. we've talked about the relationship between north korea and the middle east before. this is the first we've heard of this and this happened a couple of months ago. what do you make of it, what is the involvement we need to watch. >> this is a continuation of a trend because the north koreans have been not only selling missiles but nuclear reactors. the reactor destroyed in 2007, that was a north korean reactor. iran paid for it. the united states has not been paying enough attention to north korean proliferation. jenna: there is so much to watch, gordon how do you prioritize. >> that is the real problem, the crises is come one right after the other. it will be very difficult for the administration or even a bunch of countries to be able to deal with this because there is too much happening all at once. jenna: it certainly feels that way. you give us a lot of thins to think about. it's good to have you on set. thank you. appreciate it very much. jon: a couple of icons of the american lunch box could be no more. we might be seeing the last of the twinninge
in and day in and day out, from syria, iran, libya. they would've taken some of the resources and money for the welfare of their own people, it could have turned completely different. look at the number of missiles that they managed to organize out there. this is who we are up against. we are up against an organization that doesn't recognize the right to exist. people forget that. they don't recognize the right to exist. they preach to the genocide of jews. they are enemies to anyone who says, hey, what would happen? are not people we can talk to, but these guys are the enemy. we are targeting the military infrastructure, so at the end of the day, we will be able to sit down with reasonable people to do something. megyn: the rocket fire had been raining in israel for some time. finally, israel struck back and took out the equivalent of, they say it is like hamas's osama the modern -- osama bin laden. they say that this is like a new york or los angeles. can you speak to this? at the huge number of troops -- potentially up to 75,000 troops. what can be done? according to trace gallagher'
, the conflict would probably be spreading to syria, creating one large issue. withdrawing from the western part of afghanistan. it would be disruptive of the security of oil flowing through the strait of hormuz. and there is a further uncertainty involved in that kind of an operation common namely how successful would be, in fact. and estimates regarding israel's potential to be decisively effective and estimates depend on the scale of the american attack. even a relatively modest attack by the united states would inflict serious casualties when the ratings for this for precipitation of the spirit are still unknown factors of what happens. there will be a significant factor of human casualties, particularly in places that are larger than some facilities, that have been destroyed or relocated. all of that makes an attack not a very attractive remedy for dealing with the problem. a problem which then would pale with significance compared to the consequences of the attack once the dynamic concept was set in motion. so i dismiss that serious alternative. i think it would be an act of utter irrespon
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